Tag Archives: VMware

VMware PEX 2015: New Stuff With vSphere 6

With version 6.0 of VMware’s flagship product comes plenty of enhancements. According to VMware’s press release, there are more than 650 improvements, but I have not seen a master list yet. The maximums of vSphere are leapfrogging the maximums of Hyper-V. Unless you are planning on running SAP HANA in a virtualized environment, you could probably not give a crap about some of the scalability enhancements. They may be nice to have but how often will you use them. Here are some of the improvements to vSphere 6.0:

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VMware PEX 2015: The Big Announcements

As expected, several announcements were made at VMware Partner Exchange 2015. The most anticipated announcements involved vSphere 6, VSAN 6 and EVO:RAIL. As an old dog I’ve become fairly jaded in reaction to many of these announcements. However there are some significant features in vSphere 6 and VSAN 6. There are’s also some interesting things surrounding EVO:RAIL.
The message from VMware to its 4000 attending Partners was  “One Cloud, Any application, Any Device.” Oh, and no more PEX in the future. The plan is to have all technical sessions available at VMworld, which is a horrible idea. EMC does this at EMC World and all of the technical people are shuffling back and forth between SE-focused sessions and customer-focused sessions.

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VMware PEX 2014 – Notes Part 2 – The Good

The most significant part of VMware PEX, for me this year, was the Solutions Exchange floor and the rather small number of vendors. My focus was on convergence of compute and storage resources. This appears to be a popular path. There were a few things along the way, other than cheap swag, that caught my eye. One interesting conversation involved FusionIO. They validated that many customers concentrate more on storage space instead of performance and that this is not good. Some more progressive enterprises are very focused on performance. For instance, eBay actually measures costs based on url per kilowatt. Read more »

Using the Free vSphere Hypervisor? VMware Wants to Hear from You.

Interesting that I stumbled on this right after I posted a How-To for the free vSphere Hypervisor.

Mike Adams over at VMware wants to know if you are using the free vSphere Hypervisor. If so, he would like you to complete a very short survey so he can understand how you are using it. Check out his post on the VMware blog.

How-To: License the Free VMware vSphere Hypervisor

One of the things that some of the Microsoft Hyper-V users tout is that Hyper-V is free. Sometimes, like in smaller offices or branch locations, it may even make sense to use Hyper-V where there are four or less VMs on a host. The Windows 2008 Server Enterprise Edition license will allow for the base Hyper-V installation and up to four Windows 2008 Server VMs on the hardware. But there are many valid reasons to run VMware’s vSphere Hypervisor, the free version of ESXi in your datacenter. Read more »

PAVMUG Session – Optimal Designs for vSphere 5 Licensing

The PAVMUG session on Sept 22nd, 2011 that seemed to have the second most active audience was the session where I discussed vSphere 5 licensing and some of the design considerations. There were several good questions that I would like to re-address here and share some helpful links that I promised during the session. There is a great PowerCLI script and a tool that VMware themselves offer.

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A Few Gotchas With vSphere 4.1! Updated

Since everyone else in the world is heralding the release of vSphere 4.1, I figured I would post some bad news. The stuff you may want to know BEFORE you jump into upgrading to vSphere 4.1. Before I start, I want to make it clear that vSphere 4.1 is a great product overall. And I have already been leaning to ESXi, so the announcement that this will be the last release with the “traditional” ESX has been expected. I will talk about ESXi and its improvements in a later post. I just want you to be aware of these rather significant Gotchas.

Gotcha #1 – Read Only Role allows members to add VMKernel NICs

From the release notes (You actually READ these, right?):

  • Newly added users with read-only role can add VMkernel NICs to ESX/ESXi hosts
    Newly added users with a read-only role cannot make changes to the ESX/ESXi host setup with the exception of adding VMkernel NICs, which is currently possible.

    Workaround: None. Do not rely on this behavior because read-only users will not be able to add VMkernel NICs in the future.

This is a fairly big security issue. I just LOVE the workaround notes. To be fair, I have found only one installation in my experience that uses the Read-Only Role. In my opinion, if they don’t have access to the physical data center, they don’t need any access to vCenter. But this is just something that should have been corrected before release.

Gotcha #2 – ESX/ESXi installations on HP systems require the HP NMI driver

  • ESX installations on HP systems require the HP NMI driver
    ESX 4.1 instances on HP systems require the HP NMI driver to ensure proper handling of non-maskable interrupts (NMIs). The NMI driver ensures that NMIs are properly detected and logged. Without this driver, NMIs, which signal hardware faults, are ignored on HP systems with ESX.

    CAUTION: Failure to install this driver might result in silent data corruption.

    Workaround: Download and install the NMI driver. The driver is available as an offline bundle from the HP Web site. Also, see KB 1021609.

It seems that every time HP releases a new set of SIM agents for ESX, something breaks. Is this VMware’s way of putting it on HP? Or was this an “OOPS”? If you search for “HP VMware NMI Driver” you come up with nothing. No download. It was no where to be found on Monday, but I did find it today on the HP support site.

Gotcha #3 – VMware View Composer 2.0.x is not supported in a vSphere vCenter Server 4.1 managed environment

The basic issue here is that vCenter 4.1 only works on a 64-bit system. View Composer only works on a 32-bit system. From the KB Article:

“VMware View Composer 2.0.x is not supported in a vSphere vCenter Server 4.1 managed environment as vSphere vCenter Server 4.1 requires a 64 bit operating system and VMware View Composer does not support 64 bit operating systems.
“VMware View 4.0.x customers who use View Composer should not upgrade to vSphere vCenter Server 4.1 at this time. Our upcoming VMware View 4.5 will be supported on VMware vSphere 4.1.”

Don’t these guys talk to each other? Didn’t they learn their lesson with the PCoIP issues? And why can’t you just admit it in the release notes instead of putting a link to the KB article? I completely missed this Monday morning.

Gotcha #4 – vCenter Installer SILENTLY Changes SQL Server Settings to Allow Named Pipes

  • vCenter Server installation or upgrade silently changes Microsoft SQL Server settings to enable named pipes
    When you install vCenter Server 4.1 or upgrade vCenter Server 4.0.x to vCenter Server 4.1 on a host that uses Microsoft SQL Server with a setting of “Using TCP/IP only,” the installer changes that setting to “Using TCP/IP and named pipes” and does not present a notification of the change.Workaround: The change in setting to “Using TCP/IP and named pipes” does not interfere with the correct operation of vCenter Server. However, you can use the following steps to restore the setting to the default of “Using TCP/IP only.”
  1. Select Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server 2005 > Configuration Tools > SQL Server Surface Area Configuration.
  2. Select Surface Area Configuration for Services and Connections.
  3. Under the SQL Server instance you are using for vCenter Server, select Remote Connections.
  4. Change the option under Local and Remote Connections and click Apply.

Can you hear the DBAs pissing and moaning?

Gotcha #4a – SQL Database is changed to Bulk Recovery Model (updated 10/27)

This on is funny. I just found out about it on 10/27/2010. When is comes to SQL for the vCenter database, VMware recommends using a simple recovery model. So, with their attention to detail, the upgrade process changes the database to a bulk recovery model. Inn this model, the logs keep growing until a backup purges it. No good.

Transaction log for vCenter Server database grows large after upgrading to vCenter Server 4.1 – http://kb.vmware.com/kb/1026430

Conclusion

Again vSphere 4.1 brings some great improvements and some welcome changes. As the product matures and more vendors work with the APIs, we will see some nice features that will help you in your journey to the private cloud. The Gotchas listed above may not exist if quality assurance is tightened. I think I would rather hear that a release is delayed because of pending bug fixes. How long will we need to wait to fix these? In any case, if the Read-Only Role or the View Composer gotchas don’t apply, then jump right in and install or upgrade to vSphere 4.1. Just make sure you install the NMI drivers and fix the SQL settings.

Update 2010-07-16

I got a tweet from William Lam last night. It looks like versions are hard-coded in Capacity-IQ making it incompatible with vSphere 4.1. Will also explains two ways to make it work.

My VCAP-DCA Exam Experience

In case you have been living under a rock and haven’t heard, VMware is getting ready to release a new set of advanced certification exams that will take you along the path to become a VMware Certified Design Expert on vSphere 4 (VCDX4). Just like VCDX3, it starts with the requirement of being a VMware Certified Professional on vSphere 4 (VCP). You will then need to pass two exams before being able to submit and defend your design. VMware has decided to award new certification statuses for passing these exams. The exam to become a  VMware Certified Advanced Professional on vSphere 4 – Datacenter Administration (VCAP-DCA) is currently finishing up its beta run. The exam to become a VMware Certified Advanced Professional on vSphere 4 – Datacenter Design (VCAP-DCD) is not yet in beta. The path to achieve VCDX4 status is laid out on VMware’s site and is illustrated below:

Just like Jason Boche, William Lam and Duncan Epping, I had the privilege of taking the beta version exam. As you can see from the upgrade path, I am not required to take the exam to obtain the VCDX4, but I am a glutton for punishment I guess. Also, not having it as a requirement took some of the pre-test jitters off of me. At first, scheduling conflicts prevented me from being able to sit for the exam within VMware’s original deadline. However, I got a call on June 17th that I could take it on July 2nd. Wow…a two week notice, and on my only scheduled day off since April. But I eagerly accepted the invite. Because of the limited notice and the fact that I was juggling a few projects at the same time I debated even studying for the exam. An unscientific survey on twitter showed that 4 out of 4 followers recommended that I study for the exam. I don’t want to come across as arrogant or as a “know-it-all.” My argument here is that I am already a VCDX, I should know this stuff.  My schedule and my severe procrastination tendencies made me decide to do a little bit of review the night before.

Before I begin with my thoughts on the exam content, I want to express that I only had two “issues” with the exam experience itself. First a little bit of background: The exam consists of 41 “questions”, which are actually multifaceted problems that you need to solve with the tools that are presented to you. You have 4.5 hours to complete the exam. The problems are presented in a familiar Vue test engine. You click a button to switch to a desktop session with a few of the typical tools used  to administer a vSphere environment. The issue was with the screen refresh for the GUI based tools. When I clicked on an item, sometimes all of the tabs are not presented properly or the content is not complete. This was pretty annoying and sometimes a hindrance. When I participated in the beta exam for the VI3 Advanced Administration Exam, I did not experience this. Hopefully, this will be cleared up before the exam becomes GA. I would think that a leader in desktop virtualization would have a method to avoid this type of thing. The second issue is a provision for breaks. You can take “unscheduled breaks” but I think the clock keeps ticking. It would be nice to actually have a scheduled break without a time penalty. As you get older, you NEED the breaks…

Now, on to the content. Forget about me actually telling you the actual content of the exam. The NDA prevents this and I want to participate in future beta exams. I got my VCDX3 via beta exams and I hope to get my VCDX4 this way!

I’ll admit it. Working primarily in the SMB market limits your skills a bit. I am not as exposed to some of the more advanced features of vSphere 4 as I used to be when I worked in an “enterprise” market.  I skipped a couple of problems because of this. I intended to return to them, but the clock ran out before I could. The problems were a very good compendium of the advanced skills required of a more senior VMware Administrator. It was the toughest exam that I have ever taken. The second toughest was the VI3 Advanced Administration Exam. I thought the questions were very fair and there was nothing in the content that caused me any objections.

I was pretty relaxed when I started the exam, but started to PANIC during the last 30 minutes.

The one (personal) issue I have with this type of exam is that it measures you at a point in time on how much you have memorized. Since I don’t want to use an example of a problem that may be on a VMware exam, I will use one of my cars as an example here. Say, for instance that I am sitting in on the 1972 Ford Gran Torino Advanced Administration Exam…

Let’s say a question on the exam is to set the Ignition Points gap. This is something I did a few times on several cars. I know where to find the ignition points. I know how to set the gap. I have the proper tools to do it.  But I don’t know what that setting should be. In the REAL world, I would look it up in a manual or on Google. And I looked up the setting every time I did it. Would I fail the test because I know HOW to do it, but don’t know the proper setting? Probably. My teenie brain can’t hold all of this information – especially with all of the Monty Python references in there, not to mention the words for almost every song by Rush and Iron Maiden…

My Advice

Back on track… Echoing Duncan, Jason and William,  I have a few tips to offer for this exam:

  1. Read the Exam Blueprint. Perform each task listed in the blueprint a few times, so you know HOW to do it. You DO have access to “–help” and man pages during the exam if you are stumped. However, refer to item #3.
  2. Build a LAB! You will need it for item #1. You don’t have to go out and buy servers and storage. All you need is a reasonably fast 64bit PC or laptop with a decent amount of RAM. Some things may be slow, but you will get through it. You can make an ESX server in a VM. Use VMware Player or VMware Workstation to host your lab VMs. Every VMware product in the blueprint is either free or has an evaluation period. Didn’t you get a free VMware Workstation license with your VCP?
  3. Manage your time! I ran out of it. You have the opportunity to go back. Skip questions if you don’t know how to do it or think it will take a while. The other thing I noticed was that, since the exam is using a live lab environment, the tasks happen in real time. During my panic state, I started to multitask and work on more than one problem at a time. Instead of clicking “Next” and waiting for the task to complete, click “Next” and start on the next problem. Juggle two or three problems. Use your dry erase board to keep track of skipped problems and multitasking. I am not very fast with my typing and I am constantly mixing up letters in words. I call it “typing dyslexia” and it doesn’t help me in these situations!

I don’t know if I passed this one. I am a little bit pessimistic at this time. I will find out in “4-6 weeks”, but that is VMware Time… Good luck to all that have or are planning to take this exam.

vShield Zones – Some Serious Gotchas

OK..I’ll admit it: I am spoiled by the capabilities of vSphere. What other platform lets you schedule system updates that will occur unattended and without outages of the applications being used? I don’t mean the winders patches, they require a monthly reboot. I am talking about the hypervisor updates. VMware Update Manager coordinates all of this for you. Then along comes vShield Zones to break it all.

First, let me explain what I am trying to do. To simplify things, vShield Zones is a firewall for vSphere Virtual Machines. Rather than regurgitate how it works, take a look at Rodney’s excellent post. A customer has decided to use vShield Zones to help with PCI Compliance. The desire is that only certain VMs will be allowed to communicate with certain other VMs using specific network ports, and to audit that traffic. ’nuff said.

vShield Zones seems to be the perfect solution for this. It works almost seamlessly with vCenter and the underlying ESXi hosts. It provides hardened Linux Virtual Appliances (vShield Agents) to provide the firewalling. It provides a fairly nice management interface to create the firewall rules and distribute them to the vShield Agents. Best of all, IT’S FREE! At least for vSphere Advanced versions and above. Keep in mind, that this is still considered a 1.x release and some things need to be worked out.

Now, on to the gotchas.

Gotcha #1 – Networking

When it comes to networking, the vShield Agent is designed to sit between a vSwitch that is externally connected via physical NICs (pNICs) and a vSwitch that is isolated from the outside world. The vShield Agent installation wizard will prompt you to select a vSwitch to protect. This is illustrated below. The red line indicates network traffic flow.

Click the Image to Enlarge

Click the Image to Enlarge

This works like a champ in this configuration, using a vSwitch for management, which is naturally on an isolated network to begin with, using a vSwitch for VMs to connect to the vShield Agent and using a vSwitch to connect everything to the outside world.  This can also be deployed with limited down time. If you are lucky enough to have the Enterprise Plus version, you may want to use a vNetwork Distributed Switch or even a Cisco 1000v. You will need to make some manual configurations to make this work as outlined in the admin guide.

The gotcha is with blade servers or “pizza box” servers that have limited I/O slots. If all of the VM traffic must flow through the same physical NICs and you use a vSwitch, then you need the vShield Agent to protect a port group rather than an entire vSwitch. You will need to create a vSwitch with a protected port group and connect it to the pNICs. Then you you can install the vShield Agent. Once the vShield Agent is installed, you will need to go back to the vSwitch attached to the pNICs and add an unprotected port group. This is illustrated below. The red line is the protected traffic and the blue line is the unprotected traffic.

Click on Image to Enlarge

Click on Image to Enlarge

As you can see, there is an unprotected Port Group (ORIGINAL Network). This needs to be added to the vSwitch AFTER the vShield Agent is installed. If the ORIGINAL Network is already a part of the vSwitch, it will need to be removed BEFORE installing the vShield Agent. In order to avoid an outage, you will need to disable DRS and manually vMotion all VMs off of the ESX/ESXi host before installing the vShield Agent and modifying the port groups.

Gotcha #2 – DRS/HA Settings

The vShield Agents attach to isolated vSwitches with no pNIC connection. As you should already know, using DRS and vMotion on an isolated vSwitch could cause inter-connectivity between VMs to fail. By default, you cannot vMotion a VM that is attached to an isolated vSwitch. You will need to enable this by editing the vpxd.cfg file. You will also need to disable HA and DRS for the vShield Agents so they stay on the hosts where they are  installed. Both are well documented. Obviously, you will need to install a vShield Agent on every ESX/ESXi host in the cluster.

The Gotcha here is that, with HA disabled for the vShield Agent, there is no facility for automatic startup. There is an automatic startup setting in the startup/shutdown section of the configuration settings. First, this is an all-or-nothing setting. Second, according to the Availability Guide:

“NOTE The Virtual Machine Startup and Shutdown (automatic startup) feature is disabled for all virtual machines residing on hosts that are in (or moved into) a VMware HA cluster. VMware recommends that you do not manually re-enable this setting for any of the virtual machines. Doing so could interfere with the actions of cluster features such as VMware HA or Fault Tolerance.”

So, if a host fails, HA will restart all protected VMs on different hosts. If the host comes back on line, you risk having DRS migrate protected VMs back to that host. This will cause those VMs to become disconnected because the vShield Agent will not automatically start. If a host fails, hope that it fails good enough so it won’t restart.

Gotcha #3 – Maintenance Mode

At the beginning of this post, I mentioned how VMware Update Manager has spoiled me. VUM can be scheduled to patch VMs and hosts. When host patching is scheduled, VUM will place one host in Maintenance Mode, which will evacuate all VMs. Then, it will apply whatever patches are scheduled to be applied, reboot and then exit Maintenance Mode. It will repeat this for each host in a cluster. This works great unless there are running VMs that have DRS disabled, like the vShield Agent.

In the test environment, when a host was manually set to enter Maintenance Mode, it would stall at 2% without moving the test VMs. I am not sure the order that VMs are migrated off, but none were migrated in the test environment. This could vary in different installations. Here’s the gotcha: you cannot power the vShield Agent off because the protected VMs would become disconnected. You cannot migrate it to a different host because it would cause a serious conflict and cause protected VMs to become disconnected. The only thing you can do is place the host in Maintenance Mode, then MANUALLY (*GASP*) migrate all of the protected VMs and then power the vShield Agent off. So much for automated patch management. We’re back to the “oughts.”

Conclusion

I said already that vShield Zones is a 1.x product. It’s a great firewall, but it has a few gotchas that you need to consider. The benefits may outweigh the negatives. But vSphere is a 4.0 product.Some of this should be able to be addressed by tweaking vCenter or host settings.

vShield Zones should be smart enough to allow us to select specific port groups to protect rather than an entire vSwitch. I guess whatever scripting is being done in the background will need to be changed for this. Maybe we need a Ghetto vShield?

One of the REALLY smart people at VMware should be able to tell us the “order of migration” when a host is placed in Maintenance Mode. Once that is determined, there is probably a configuration file somewhere that we could tweak to change it.

There should be a way to set up automatic startup and shutdown of individual VMs. The Startup/Shutdown settings sort of deprecated once DRS was introduced. The only time it is useful is with a stand-alone server or in a NON-DRS cluster. I guess the only thing that could be done is to add a script somewhere in rc.d or rc.local to start up these VMs, but how can that be done in a “supported” fashion with ESXi and is it supported in either ESX or ESXi?

I brought these issues up with some VMware engineers and they assure me that they are working on this. Hopefully they will figure it out soon. I hate doing things manually. It seems like it is anti-cloud.

Creating an Automated ESXi Installer

Back in the summer, I saw Stu’s Post about automating the installation of ESXi. I was reminded again by Duncan’s Post. Then, I found myself in a situation when a customer bought 160 blades for VMware ESXi. With this many systems, it would be almost impossible to do this without mistakes. I took the ideas from Stu and Duncan and created an ESXi automated installer that works from a PXE deployment server, like the Ultimate Deployment Appliance. I took it a step further and added the ability to use a USB stick or a CD for those times when PXE is not allowed. The document below is a result of it.

This is a little different than the idea of a stateless ESXi server, where the hypervisor actually boots from PXE. This is the installer booting from PXE so that the hypervisor can be installed on local disk, an internal USB stick or SD card. You could also use it for a “boot from SAN” situation, but extreme care should be taken so you don’t accidentally format a VMFS disk.

As always, if anyone has comments, corrections, etc., please feel free to post a comment below.

The document can be found here -> Creating an Automated ESXi Installer

Summary

The ability to use an automated, unattended installation routine for a hypervisor is necessary whenever it is deployed to multiple systems or is done frequently. Automated installations help avoid a misconfiguration caused by human error, which become common when repetitive tasks are performed.  Because the “traditional” version of VMware ESX Server contains a Red Hat Linux based console operating system, we have been able to leverage kickstart scripts for automated installation. With the ESXi hypervisor, much of this functionality is not available because of the smaller footprint.

This document explains how to set up ESXi with little intervention. The modifications explained here can be used to deploy ESXi using a PXE server. In our examples we will use the Ultimate Deployment Appliance, but these methods will also transfer to such commercial packages as HP Rapid Deployment Pack, Altiris, or even a home grown PXE server. The modifications can also be used for deploying ESXi using a USB stick or a customized CD.

Requirements

  • ESXi Server Installable The ESXi CD image can be downloaded from the VMware site, however using a systems management and monitoring server, such as HP SIM or Dell OpenManage is highly recommended. Since there are usually vendor specific CIM providers to enhance the monitoring capabilities, some vendors will provide a customized CD image with the CIM providers. These additional CIM providers will also allow for more information to be displayed in the hardware sections of the vSphere Client. A search for “ESXi” on the HP and Dell sites produced links to the latest customized images.
  • Deployment Server A deployment server will allow for a controlled, automated installation of the ESXi Server software. The ability to handle multiple operating system installations is also desired. The ability to provide PXE and DHCP services is required as well. Most times, the deployment server will be running PXE services and TFTP. The DHCP services may be running on a different server in an enterprise. This document does not explain how to set up a separate DHCP server. For this document, we will be using the Ultimate Deployment Appliance (UDA) version 2.0 (beta).
  • Virtualization Software The UDA runs as a “Virtual Appliance,” which is a pre-configured virtual machine. It will run under VMware ESXi (available as a free or licensed instance), VMware Workstation (available for purchase), VMware Player (free) or VMware Server (free). In this document, VMware Workstation is used.
  • Optional software Although no additional software is required when using the UDA, you will need additional software if you plan on using a USB stick or if you plan on creating a customized CD image:
    • VMware Converter If you plan on using ESXi or Server to host the UDA, VMware Converter can be used to import the virtual appliance.
    • Syslinux In order to make a bootable USB stick, you will need the syslinux utility. This utility is available for Linux and Windows. The UDA does not include it. As an alternative, you can use the unetbootin utility.
    • CD Imaging and Burning In order to create a bootable CD image, you will need software to create the CD image (mkisofs) and then software to burn the image to the CD media (cdrecord). The cdrtools project includes versions for Linux and Windows. Most Debian versions of Linux, such as Ubuntu, come with the cdrkit, which uses genisoimage for imaging and wodim for burning.
    • Linux Desktop If you look at the contents of the ESXi CDs using Windows (Windows 7 was used), you may see all of the files listed using all capital letters. Since the ESXi software is based on Linux, all file operations are case sensitive and expect the files to be all lower case. This may cause errors when attempting to create the automated installer. For this reason, a Linux desktop is recommended. For most of the operations, UDS may be used. The only missing software on the UDA is syslinux. For a feature rich Linux desktop, Ubuntu is recommended. A few pre-configured Ubuntu Desktop virtual appliances are also available.

Conclusion

Once you have a hypervisor installed you will need to configure the server and add it to vCenter in an automated fashion. Look for a future doc covering this. For now, check out these resources for post install configurations:

http://communities.vmware.com/docs/DOC-7364

http://communities.vmware.com/docs/DOC-7511

http://communities.vmware.com/docs/DOC-8170

vSphere 4.0 Quick Start Guide Released

The vSphere 4.0 Quick Start Guide: Shortcuts down the path of Virtualization has finally arrived!

I received a pre-release edition of the book at VMworld 2009. This guide has a great selection of shortcuts, tips and best practices for setting up and maintaining vSphere 4. I would be an excellent addition to any VMware administrator’s bookshelf. The book’s size also makes it a great reference for consultants as well. It will easily fit into your backpack.

It was authored by the following geniuses from the community:

Shows these guys some love and pick up a copy to support their efforts.

Behind the Scenes Photos of VMworld Data Center

Two words: Holy Crap!

http://virtualgeek.typepad.com/virtual_geek/2009/08/an-awesome-peek-behind-the-scenes-of-getting-hardware-ready-for-vmworld-2009.html

VI3 ATDG Available as a free download now!

Just like they did with the Advanced Technical Design Guide for VI2, Scott, Mike and Ron are releasing the VI3 ATDG today. I read it when it was first released and it is a great reference.

Go get some -> http://www.vmguru.com/

How-To: Disable Debug Mode in Workstation 7.0 Beta

OK… I know the wonks at VMware will frown upon this one, but someone posted a similar hack for WS 6.5 beta, so here it is for WS 7.0 beta. I finally got around to installing the beta code this morning and immediately saw a performance issue. VMware Workstation Beta runs in debug mode by default. It can seriously slow down your VMs. If you are playing with vSphere and ESX/ESXi 4.0 inside a VM, it is horribly slow once you get to the VM inside of the VM. This is actually part of the testing VMware would like you to perform while using the beta.

For Linux, you will find the files in /usr/lib/vmware/bin. For Winders, they are probably somewhere in %PROGRAMS%. I usually stick to Linux for my host.

Basically, perform the following to disable debug mode. Shut down VMware first!

sudo mv /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx-debug /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx-debug.old
sudo cp /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx-debug
The Result After Renaming the Files

Click on the Image for a Larger View

Now, you have tricked the apploader to use the standard build. I would assume you will have similar results with Winders. Just add “.exe” onto the end of the referenced files names. Easy huh?

DISCLAIMER:

This is neither supported nor recommended by VMware. If you have any issues with the beta version and wish to post to the forums or file and SR, you MUST revert back to debug mode and reproduce the error or VMware may not help you. This is a beta TEST. VMware will want debug info to check any suspected bugs before releasing it GA.

vSphere Install and Upgrade Best Practices KB Articles and Links

So, I use NewsGator to aggregate a BAZILLION feeds from several sources, blogs, like this one, actual news feeds and a bunch of VMware feeds. The VMware feeds are from the VI:OPS and VMTN forums. The VMTN forums allow you to create a custom feed by selecting the RSS link at the bottom right of each page or you can get a feed from a specific section of the forum by clicking the link on the bottom left of a list. On of the custom feed options is to get a feed of the new KB articles.

VMware has released quite a lot of new KB articles surrounding vSphere. They just released nice best practice guidelines for installing or upgrading to ESX 4 and vCenter 4. They are short and to the point. There is also a nice article covering best practices for upgrading an ESX 3.x virtual machine to ESX 4.0. One thing I noticed, but never thought about is this :

“Note: If you are using dynamic DNS, some Windows versions require ipconfig/reregister to be run.”

Eric Seibert over at vSphere-Land posted a nice set of “missing links” for everything vSphere. This is a nice, comprehensive set of links to evetrything you need for vSphere upgrades or installs.So, go check that out as well.

VMware Partner Exchange Notes – Keynotes

Here are some breif notes from VMware Partner Exchange. I will also post about some of the technical sessions. I am not going to regurgitate the keynotes. The content will be available soon on Partner Central and there are several blogs that have plenty of information from the keynotes. I will however provide some highlights:

Partner Central and Partner University will soon be revamped. The accreditations will be changing and will require a certain number of accredited VCPs before the company can get an accreditation. The categories will be similar to our practices, such as infrastructure virtualization, desktop virtualization and BCDR. If you go to partner central now and click on the partner university link, you will see a little bit of what the changes will be. There is also plenty of web-based, self-paced training. On line tests are available so you can receive accreditations for many different products, most are jumpstarts and plan and design related.

VMware’s obvious desire is “100% virtualized.” Their primary focus will center around cloud computing with an initial push for the internal cloud as many see challenges with getting acceptance for the external cloud. Private clouds will eventually bridge the gaps between the internal and external clouds. Much of this information is already available on VMware’s main site.

The software surrounding VI4 took around 3 million engineering hours to develop. It includes great improvements on resources that will be available to the VMs. The resources will be increased to 8 vCPUs per VM, 256GB RAM per VM, 40 Gbps network throughput per VM, and 200,000 storage IOPS per VM. vCenter maximums will increase to 3000 VMs / 300 Hosts. There will also be a capability for linking up to 10 vCenter servers with a centralized search function.

A new function centers around host profiles, which works similarly to VUM. It establishes configuration baselines for an ESX / ESXi host that includes such things as network, security, storage and NTP settings. A host can be scanned for compliance and remediated with the baseline. The BIG “however” is that it will require “Enterprise Plus” to enable host configuration controls and distributed switches. This will carry a $600 price tag and is not ala carte.

Using ESX4 allowed for 85% native performance on 8-way RHEL/Oracle servers in spec performance tests. The amount of transactions (I forget how many) was 8x the number of Visa’s current transactions.

Out of the gate, vSphere will offer optional components surrounding security, BCDR and networking. Additional vSpere components will become available “over the summer.”

Fixed: VMware Tools status shows as not running after running VMware Consolidated Backup

A while back I mentioned that VMware Tools would appear to change to a not running status after a VCB Snapshot was taken. Vmware said a fix would be forthcoming in ESX U4. VMegalodon posted on the communities this morning that he is running VC 2.5U3 and ESX 3.5 U4 (Which is probably a bad combination…) and the VMware Tools issue appears to be corrected.

So, what are you waiting for?? Get to upgrading!

Thanks VMegalodon!