Tag Archives: Cloud Computing

vCloud Trick – Joining a Domain and Specifying a Machine OU

NOTE: This is no longer required in vCD 5.1 & above!

This is one of those situations where I really start to hate computers!  I was working with vCloud Director with a goal of having a winders VM run through guest customization, change the name, get a fixed IP from the network pool, join an Active Directory Domain and move to a specific OU in the AD.

The Problem

There is a spot in the VM properties to specify a domain to join. You can use the settings specified in the organization or enter the domain information directly. Read more »

Big vCloud Director Security Gotchas That I Have Found

This post includes an important security “gotcha” that I recently uncovered with vCloud Director 1.5 running on vSphere 5. If you are using vCloud Director, you should check your settings.

The BIG Security Issue

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What is Cloud Computing? I Don’t Care!! Part Two

As an update to yesterday’s “I don’t care” post, Mike DiPetrillo has claimed ownership of the original “I don’t care” quote.

And just so everyone understands completely, the “I don’t care” is for the users. The administrators should absolutely care. Users should not need to care. The design of the cloud should be such that the user doesn’t need to care.

Did you put all your stuff in containers yet?

What is Cloud Computing? I Don't Care!!

So , today I sat in a seminar hosted by VMware, EMC, Cisco and SunGard. It was called “Take the Risk Out of Cloud Computing“. It was the same old mantra…Create your Internal Cloud now in preparation for the coming of the External Cloud. SunGard puts an availability twist with its view on things: “Let us be your hosted cloud and/or your DR cloud.” The sessions seemed to be designed to inform someone who knows about virtualization, but may not understand cloud computing. I was there to see what SunGard’s take on it was. In the Cloud realm, they do two things and they do them well: hosting and DR. (I have to admit, I served a five year sentence with SunGard…)

When Clair Roberts got up to speak, the first thing he did was read the official VMware definition of Cloud Computing. Then he gave his own definition: “I don’t care!” Later, I spoke with him and he admitted that he borrowed it from someone else at VMware, so I am going to borrow it from them, too.

Think about it. “I don’t care!” I don’t care where it is. I don’t care about the hardware. I don’t care how it got there. I don’t care how it cooled. I don’t care how it is powered. I DO care that it is there when I need it and is reasonably responsive from anywhere at any time. That’s it. That’s what cloud computing should be.  Plain and simple: “I Don’t Care!”

Later, David Freund from EMC gave another good analogy of how Cloud Computing should be. He compared it to Intermodal Freight Transport.  You buy or rent a STANDARDIZED CONTAINER and put stuff in it. You don’t care how it gets to the destination, only that it gets there.

Today’s assignment is to put your stuff in the standardized container. That way we can put it somewhere later.

Questioning SaaS

I was torn on whether or not to post this rant, but then I read a post that made my head spin….

First, there was the “Great Gmail Outage of February 2009“. There are constant Twitter outages as it grows in popularity and the servers struggle to keep up. Just last week, Yahoo Mail and Hotmail users were suffering through outages. I read on one site “Although the timing of the incident means that UK customers are unlikely to have been affected, the news will add to those doubts some users have over the software-as-a-service model.” This is the post that nudged me into posting this rant. I have had a few Hotmail accounts since 1998 and have had occasional access issues through the years, before I even knew what SaaS meant. My question is this: So What?!?

How can you doubt Saas because your free email is down? Free is free. You get what you pay for. I read that Google has offered credits to the paying GMail customers, and that is the proper thing to do. But how can executives whine because their GMail/Hotmail/Yahoo is off line when they don’t pay for it? Why are they not paying for a business email service?  I have worked for a few companies that have used “ousourced” paid email services – the REAL model for SaaS. I have had scheduled outages during hours when I am sleeping.

The fact is that Saas is here to stay and it is increasing in value and popularity. Yes, Google is leading the way with their free apps.  Saas is a piece of Cloud Computing. Check out this video explaining Cloud Computing in Plain English: