Monthly Archives: August 2009

VMworld 2009 – Blogging, Tweets and the "Ask a vExpert" Booth

Well, VMworld 2009 is almost upon us! I have an ungodly schedule for next week. I start the S&M with a nice refreshing VCDX Design Defense bright and early Monday morning at the VMware San Fransisco office. Then, its off to the SF Mariott for a relaxing sit by the VCP 4.0 Exam engine. Of course, I’ll round that off with a healthy dose of VMware View in the Advanced Configuration Lab.

I will try to add notes from the sessions throughout the week. Most will be techie notes from the breakout sessions, but if I hear anything that I deem noteworthy from any of the keynotes or from the floor, I will be sure to post that as well. I have loaded heavily on the VMware View sessions this year to try to force feed myself on the Desktop Virtualization part of the Cloud. I have always resisted this part of it because it brings back those lovely times where I lived in the times of hearing the whiners saying: “I can’t print!” or “I forgot my password!”. Anyway, resistance IS futile and I WILL be assimilated. If you’re looking to meet up, I posted a shared Google Calendar along with a screen shot of my VMworld Schedule below.

John Troyer from VMware has been hard at work arranging for things to happen for the VMware vExperts. One of the biggest benefits for non-vExperts is the inclusion of a “Ask the vExpert” Booth this year at VMworld. The booth will be manned by at least one vExpert most of the time. So stop by and ask a question. Fellow vExpert Jase McCarty has posted a partial list of vExperts manning the booth.

One of the other things John started was a nice list of everyone that will be blogging and/or tweeting at VMworld. This list makes a great reference for finding everyone who has a blog that is VMware related.

My VMworld 2009 Schedule:

VMworld 2009 Schedule

Behind the Scenes Photos of VMworld Data Center

Two words: Holy Crap!

http://virtualgeek.typepad.com/virtual_geek/2009/08/an-awesome-peek-behind-the-scenes-of-getting-hardware-ready-for-vmworld-2009.html

More on Cisco UCS, HP Matrix and ITaaS

I just finished reading Project California: a Data Center Virtualization Server – UCS (Unified Computing System) from Cisco. It gave an excellent take on Cisco’s view of how UCS benefits a datacenter. It also explains how new technologies from Intel, QLogic and Emulex all complement the Cisco gear. As a matter of fact, the first four chapters are all about the complementing technologies. Obviously, it is all twisted into a nice package that Cisco offers as their Unified Computing System. Its a great, educational geek book.

The UCS depends on several enabling technologies, like FCoE. FCoE allows you to take your existing Fibre Channel investment and send it down an ethernet channel. A big FAT 10GbE channel. The benefit here is that you can have eight cables feed everything to eight blades and have a nice neat rack. But Scott Lowe points out some limitations on his blog. Right now, it appears that Cisco’s FCoE will terminate at the top of the rack with the Nexus 5000. The book explains how iSCSI is a great alternative and you don’t even need a CNA to make that work, but you need an iSCSI interface on the storage system. So the UCS requires change at some point in the data path.

The HP Matrix is really just the C-Class blade offering coupled with the software to enable management and orchestration, both are important aspect that I believe will assist in making Cloud Computing a reality. The beauty part of the C-Class Blades is that you can keep using Fibre Channel and Ethernet as separate entities, so you don’t really need to make a change in order to use them. The problem is that it doesn’t seem that HP has a mezzanine available to provide FCoE, or some of the virtualization technologies, like SRIOV, VNTag, etc. So, if you want to jump on the FCoE bandwagon or start using some of the neat new networking toys, you will need to wait for a bit.

So, there’s some things about storage, what about networking? Well, the UCS uses what is termed a Fabric Interconnect, which is described as a multiplexer that funnels the sixteen 10GbE ports from the blades down to eight 10GbE uplink ports. I am taking this to be their version of HP’s Virtual Connect, with the added benefit of transferring all of those little Cisco features right up to the Nexus 1000-V dvSwitch. This returns control of the complete network path back to the network admins. This gives the network admins the ability to set up things like policies at the VM level. These settings will follow the VM during VMotion activities, which should allow for a more efficient network.

HP only offers Virtual Connect if you want 10GbE switching within the chassis. Don’t misunderstand me, there is absolutely nothing wrong with Virtual Connect. I have even set them up in (traditionally) Cisco networks. But there are also politics involved when choosing the networking. If HP wants to tout flexibility with interconnects, they may want to make nice with Cisco and come up with a Nexus offering. Or is this a case of Cisco taking their ball and going home to try to force people to buy UCS? I don’t know a lot about Dell Blades, but I don’t see a Cisco 10GbE there either. I used to hear the quip that all of the winders, Linux and Unix boxes are just I/O attached to the Mainframe. Is this a case of the x64 boxes being just I/O attached to the network?

As for ITaaS, both UCS and HP offer some pretty software to allow for management and orchestration. Both have their plusses and minuses (C’mon Cisco… Java? Really?!?) This could be where HP has a big leg up on Cisco. With all of their management software having the same look and feel, on-the-fly dynamic changes can take place with less sdministrator interaction. I’m not so sure CIsco can allow you to provision server, network and storage from the OS to the LUN. Like I said Cloud Computing won’t become a commonplace reality until all of the moving parts can be managed, monitored and provisioned (Orchestration). I’m still not convinced that HP software will allow me to create a RAID/Disk group and provision storage on an EMC box. I’m not so sure that Cisco will play nice in a Brocade fabric and allow for all of the Brocade specific features. And what about someone that chooses to (*GASP*) install an OS directly on the blade? I know that I can provision any hypervisor or winders or Linux on an HP blade. Can Cisco provide an interface to provision an OS directly on the hardware? How about the ability to have VMware running on a blade today, Xen next week and Linux the following week? All without an administrator mounting a CD or interacting with the installer? And how about having that VMware or Xen or Linux OS jump over to a different blade, with or without service interruption, but without manual intervention? That’s ITaaS. That’s Cloud Computing.

DISCLAIMER: I work for a company that is both an HP Partner and a Cisco Partner. These are my opinions, not theirs. Also, I did not pay for the book, but that did not influence this post either.