Monthly Archives: July 2009

Changes to the ESX Service Console and ESX vs. ESXi…again

A whitpaper was posted in the VMTN communities Thursday outlining the differences between the ESX 3.x and ESX 4.x service console. It further offers resources for transitioning COS based apps and scripts to ESXi via the vSphere Management Assistant and the vSphere CLI. Also mentioned briefly was the vSphere PowerCLI. If you are a developer or write scripts for VMware environments, also check out the Communities Developer section.

I hear it time and time again…The full ESX console is going away. ESXi is the way to go. I know there are valid arguments for keeping ESX around, but they are few. Failing USB keys may be a valid argument, but I have not heard of this happening. If that is the case, use boot from SAN. You need SAN anyway. As for hung VM processes, there are a few ways to address this in ESXi.

If the techie wonks at VMware are publishing articles about how to transition to ESXi, then resistance is futile…you WILL be assimilated…

Stevie's Unified Event Management, My Cloud Shangri-La

If you know Steve Chambers you know he just moved to Cisco. Before that, he was with VMware and has been a pillar of the VI:OPS boards. He is now working on a document about Unified Event Management and in the spirit of community, he is looking for comments, suggestion, etc. He called my attention to the post via Twitter as we were discussing Splunk and it’s capabilities for “Centralized Event Aggregation” (Steve’s terms). Take a look at his post when you get a chance and make some comments. You know that I have heralded the benefits of a centralized logging server. Steve just plain gets it.

And since I mentioned Cisco, I also discovered that Cisco put out a whitepaper on their take regarding the Virtualization Blueprint for the Datacenter. Its their take on how virtualization will benefit your business.  The chart shows how a business’ agility will increase as we climb the lifecycle from consolidation to virtualization and then on to automation.

It doesn’t matter what you are using underneath of it all – VMware, Xen, Hyper-V – UCS, Matrix. It just matters that you have methods to provide centralized monitoring and centralized automation. Although centralized event monitoring and centralized automation are two different things, they are both necessary if you wish to properly monitor and manage your piece of the cloud. I’ve already said my piece on the need for centralized event monitoring and Steve lays out a sample blueprint.

Automation is the new big thing when it comes to the cloud. VMware saw that way back when and they bought Dunes almost two years ago. VMware Orchestrator (VMO) was a big buzz for a little while, but great big VMware couldn’t couldn’t pull off what teenie little Dunes could when it comes to customizing the Orchestrator. They left it in a fairly decent state for smaller businesses with VMware Lifecycle Manager, but it was a hobbled state and didn’t scale very well. You can customize VMO, but you need to be good at the Dunes interface and have a decent knowledge of JavaScripting and that kind of stuff. Even being free, its not for me. The standard release of VMO allows you to set up a facility to request, approve, provision and archive VMs. A great start, but not quite enough.

A quick search for data center orchestration reveals Cisco at the top of the list. But there are others from Novell PlateSpin, Egenera, and DynamicOps that appear to do more. What we REALLY need is a way to orchestrate/ automate the entire data center. Physical servers, VMs, storage and networking can all be provisioned, monitored and managed. Can they all be managed from a common platform? Once you can have a seamless process for provisioning, managing and monitoring every component of the data center, you will see cloud computing really take off. A user (consumer / customer) that needs an application should not care if it is deployed on a physical or virtual machine, what storage devices hold the data or the network that connects it. The user should know the basic requirements for the application and the ORCHESTRATOR should make the decisions about all of these things. The orchestrator will take a request, ask for approval and make sure the application gets deployed without making mistakes. The orchestrator will interface with the monitoring facility and change management to make sure the application is accounted-for. The orchestrator will hand off to the backup facility. The orchestrator will notify you when the application as reached end of life. That’s when we will have “Cloud Shangri-La” (My term).

Discounted Exams Available at VMworld

VMware just set up some discounted certification exams at VMworld. It just gives you another reason to go!

Hi all,

VMware will be providing onsite exam services at this year’s VMworld. The exams available are the VCP on VI3, VCP on vSphere 4 and the VCDX Enteprise Administration and Design Exams. Both VCP exams can be taken for only $85, but you MUST pre-register to get this great deal! You can pre-register by visting the Pearson VUE website at http://pearsonvue.com/vmware/vmworld/ . If you do not have the opportunity to pre-register for the exam, you can take it onsite (assuming seats are still available) for only $105, which is still a significant savings.

For more information on the VCDX exams, see my post at: http://communities.vmware.com/thread/222194

So good luck to you all on your path to becoming a VCP and I look forward to seeing you at the VMworld event!

Regards,

Jon C. Hall
Technical Certification Developer
VMware, Inc.

What are you waiting for? I already registered!

VI3 ATDG Available as a free download now!

Just like they did with the Advanced Technical Design Guide for VI2, Scott, Mike and Ron are releasing the VI3 ATDG today. I read it when it was first released and it is a great reference.

Go get some -> http://www.vmguru.com/

Setting up a Splunk Server to Monitor a VMware Environment

In a previous article, I compared syslog servers and decided to use Splunk. Splunk is easy to set up as a generic Syslog server, but it can be a pain in the ass getting the winders machines to send to it. There is a home brewed java based app on the Splunk repository of user submitted solutions, but I have heard complaints about its stability and decided that I was going to set out to find a different way to do it.

During my search, I discovered some decent (free!) agents on sourceforge. One will send event logs to a syslog server (SNARE) and one will send text based files to a syslog server (Epilog). Using the SNARE agents appear to be more stable than using the Java App and does a pretty good job. So I basically came up with a free way to set up a great Syslog server using Ubuntu Server, Splunk, SNARE and Epilog.

I created a “Proven Practice Guide” for VI:OPS and posted it there, but it seems that it is stuck in the approval process. I usually psot the doc on VI:OPS and then link to it in my blog post, and follow up later with a copy on our downloads area. To hurry things along, I also posted it in both places:

http://www.dailyhypervisor.com/?file_id=17

http://viops.vmware.com/home/docs/DOC-1563

How-To: Disable Debug Mode in Workstation 7.0 Beta

OK… I know the wonks at VMware will frown upon this one, but someone posted a similar hack for WS 6.5 beta, so here it is for WS 7.0 beta. I finally got around to installing the beta code this morning and immediately saw a performance issue. VMware Workstation Beta runs in debug mode by default. It can seriously slow down your VMs. If you are playing with vSphere and ESX/ESXi 4.0 inside a VM, it is horribly slow once you get to the VM inside of the VM. This is actually part of the testing VMware would like you to perform while using the beta.

For Linux, you will find the files in /usr/lib/vmware/bin. For Winders, they are probably somewhere in %PROGRAMS%. I usually stick to Linux for my host.

Basically, perform the following to disable debug mode. Shut down VMware first!

sudo mv /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx-debug /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx-debug.old
sudo cp /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx /usr/lib/vmware/bin/vmware-vmx-debug
The Result After Renaming the Files

Click on the Image for a Larger View

Now, you have tricked the apploader to use the standard build. I would assume you will have similar results with Winders. Just add “.exe” onto the end of the referenced files names. Easy huh?

DISCLAIMER:

This is neither supported nor recommended by VMware. If you have any issues with the beta version and wish to post to the forums or file and SR, you MUST revert back to debug mode and reproduce the error or VMware may not help you. This is a beta TEST. VMware will want debug info to check any suspected bugs before releasing it GA.